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40% of california prisoners serving life sentences were sentenced for -- african-american despite california being 6.6 african-american. three strikes stands as a stark reminder of the unintended democracy. the stakes are just as high in the stakes around the country as history is poised to be made. voters have the chance to legalize, regulate and tax marijuana for use by adults. voters in maryland could be the first to endorse gay marriage by popular vote. voters seem poised to pass a proposition that would reform that same three strikes law. using direct democracy. joining us is sue, the director of policy and strategic politics at the state's network. adam, the founder and president of freedom to marry and bob herbert back at the table. sue, i want to start with you. there was an iconic moment in 2004, particularly with the anti-gay marriage ballot initiatives. it seemed like the right seized this particular tactic as their own and were using it. the other thing that strikes me is this initiatives passed in a bunch of states and taxpayer bill of rights passed in colorado. surve
workers united who works in a california warehouse, a walmart distribution center. walmart said they had no one available to join our conversation today. >> can you tell me about the work you do? you are working in a warehouse. what does it look like, how much money do you make? >> okay. thank you for having me on the show. the warehouse that i work at is in california. the work we do is like, it's hard work but it's doable work. the conditions, like the equipment is broken and the ramps are broken, which is very dangerous as well as not having water. we used to pay for our gloves and our masks and, you know, safety goggles, all our equipment. for the work we do, we lift heavy boxes and we from trailer to trailer. the weather out there, it goes up to like 120 degrees. >> so, it's 120 degrees, a trailer that gets pulled into the warehouse center and your temperature there is 102 on the thermometer. there's stuff in the australtrad that's the work. you go in and carry it out? >> yeah. we put it on a cart and pull the cart. the carts are normally, you know, broken, you know, like disassembl
in california. what we've seen is the coalition that is the progressive coalition and democratic coalition which has both gay people, african-americans. >> african-american gay people. >> you can be both it turns out. >> that that's -- i think that that coalition, the politics of working together has changed opinion. >> yeah. i think like, you know, this is why i was beginning to say i was most happiest about marriage equality. that's me speaking as a liberal. getting back to this question about is this good for the country overall? i know plenty of african-america african-americans, some have family members. you want to get into a debate about welfare, you can do it. if you want to get into a debate about taxes, you can do it. >> debate about drug legalization, you can do it. >> you can really, really do it. i oppose those people as a liberal. i hope that they never get any degree of power in the political system but they need to be recommend. when you talk about what's happening in terms of the racialization of the republican party, they deserve to be represented. this deserves to be a fight.
have to do this again. >> greg fletcher, walmart associate in california. appreciate you joining us today and give your brother-in-law and your wife my best. >> i will. thank you. >>> so this is something that labor's been working out for a long time. and yesterday, i think, was bigger than anything that's ever happened in the labor actions against walmart. there's two ways to read what happened yesterday. there's one in the context of how many workers they have, which is 1.6 million associates and it's a massive operation, and so even if 100, 200, 1,000, or 15,000 people walk out, that's relatively small. the other way to look at it is in the history of walmart which has been resistant to any kind of concerted labor action. i'm curious on your take away from yesterday. >> well, i think it's not big enough yet to see this as the turning point. i do agree that in the history of walmart, this is a bigger deal than we've seen before. and i think the fact that it comes after the election and after occupy and occupy sandy, i think, was a big deal too. there was a little bit of a shift of
. they don't have texas, california, nevada, arizona. >> the biggest immediate battle which is not getting the attention it should, in fact, it's getting very little attention is part of this whole fiscal mess coming up is the existing tax credits for renewables expire. and you see republican senators saying above all else, don't renew them. >> i think that position though, congressman, it has to break. you see more and more republican governors from red states. >> we have to insist on that. that's the most immediate thing. >> one big question i think is when you get on a path, if there's going to be a sort of virtuous cycle that can be kicked in with renewables in which things start to beat their expectations and i want to hear about what that future might look like after this break. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare... now's a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs? and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medica
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5